29 Nov

Installation Guidelines for a Check Valve

installation-guidelines-for-a-check-valve   Check valves are simple devices that allow fluid media (gas, liquid or solids such as sand or slurry) to flow only one way. Typical check valve installations are found in industrial plants, automobiles, plumbing and ventilation systems. Usually, check valve are relatively inexpensive, compared to more accurate control valves. For a given application, the valve body must be able to contain the media and pressure, and the gate action must have a durable service life. Installing check valves is a matter of determining the correct flow direction for the media and ensuring proper fittings for the inlet and outlet port.

Materials
Installing the correct check valve for a particular process means knowing the media the valve will control. Caustic or abrasive media (lime slurries, acids, cement mixes, etc.) require a check valve resistant to severe corrosion; stainless steel or ceramic check valves work well for such applications. A check valve installed to control hot water flow in a plumbing installation can be made from PVC plastic, brass or steel. As long as the valve can handle the heat and pressure of a standard water line, it will work well.

Installation
Installing a check valve is similar in procedure to installing any other valve with one important distinction: direction. The valve must be installed in the media’s flow direction–nothing can move against a closed check valve gate. Check valve manufacturers include on the valve body an arrow indicating proper flow direction.

Incoming and outgoing lines can be connected using clamps, swage fittings (fittings using a collar around the line, with the fitting and the valve stem hydraulically compressed together) or threaded fittings.

Access
Check valves work automatically to eliminate back flow in a process line. There’s no need for manual operation–the valve can be installed in relatively inaccessible locations. Although other valve installations may require clearance for actuators, access to a manual valve shut off or other features, check valves require little maintenance.

If installed as a diversion valve to relieve excess pressure or heat, the check valve gate can be adjusted to respond to specific pressure settings. For example, a check valve can prevent a steam boiler from building up too much pressure or a car’s radiator from rupturing when the coolant fails: the check valve will divert the high pressure media away from the process and avoid catastrophic failure. When pressure and heat amounts remain within operating limits, the check valve will stay closed.

 

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10 Nov

Tips for Choosing the Correct Pneumatic Fittings

tips-for-choosing-the-correct-pneumatic-fittings

 

 

Typically, you will find a range of varying pneumatic fittings easily in the market. However, the problem is that choosing an appropriate one is not simple. To take the right decision, you must be aware of the tubing to be utilized, the functional pressure of air, type of thread required for the receiving fitting, and lastly, the extent of vibration tolerable by the fitting.

 

Commonly Used Fittings

Outlined below are some of the common kinds of pneumatic fittings to help you choose the right one:

 

Quick Connect Couplings

Quick Connect Couplings are indispensable when it comes to connections that direct the flow of gas, water or air. Alternatively known as quick disconnect or quick release couplings, they offer a swift connection for transferring fluids. Usually operated manually, they serve as a great substitute for threaded and flanged connections.

 

Check Valves

In the simplest sense, check valves permit the flow in a single direction; hence, preventing reverse flow. Being a self-automated valve, they consistently work even if the manufacturing facility falls short of air, electricity or manual assistance. Not just manufacturing plants, check valves are found everywhere – even homes. In case you have a sump pump, it must have a check valve fitted over the discharge line. Check valves are utilized in every industry that makes use of pumps.

 

Hi-Duty Flareless Fittings

These fittings fall into the sub-category of compression fittings. However, they are particularly made applications that involve high pressure; usually more than 1000 PSI.

 

Push-Connect Fittings

Push-Connect Fittings use a similar mechanism as compression fittings. However, instead of using a metal-ferrule, these fittings utilize an O-ring (made using vulcanized rubber) that possesses the ability to get its actual shape let loose.

Consequently, this feature permits the fitting to get easily undone—just the way it was manufactured. Push-connect fittings have applications that involve lesser pressure. These fittings are extremely simple to connect, disconnect and then reconnect, ideal for applications that involve frequent alterations. Moreover, they can be utilized with brass, steel, copper, nylon, etc.

In addition to the above stated pneumatic fittings, there are a range of varying options, depending on the application. The more different the job requirements are, the more atypical the fittings will be.

Generally, compression fittings, push-connect fittings, specialty compression fittings can be easily bought and utilized for a broad array of applications. Find a comprehensive range of pneumatic fittings at SEALEXCEL.

Recognized as one of the finest pneumatic fittings manufacturers and suppliers, we additionally manufacture stainless steel push-in fittings, push-on fittings, monoflange valves, and more.

 

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03 Nov

What is a Plug Valve?

what-is-a-plug-valve

A plug valve is a simple type of valve that allows or blocks the flow of a liquid through a pipe. The plug itself is often shaped like an upside-down ice cream cone or a cylinder. A handle on top allows the user to turn the plug valve so it rotates and stops or starts the flow of liquid. A minimum of two holes, known as ports, must exist in the plug for liquid to flow. The ports are located on opposite sides of the plug, and when the plug is turned to the open position it creates a passage for the liquid to flow through.

This arrangement of two ports is known as a 2-port valve. The pipe in which the plug valve is installed has an area for liquid to flow in and another for liquid to flow out. When the 2-port plug valve is turned on, the ports line up with the holes in the pipe and the liquid flows straight through as if the plug valve was not there. Other, more complex plug valves known as 3-way valves allow liquid to flow to a combination of different ports. One port may connect to either of the opposite two ports, or all three may connect at once.

Two major categories of vales exist: stop valves and check valves. Stop valves follow a basic design structure to turn the flow of liquid on and off, or allow partial flow. Check valves, in contrast, allow liquid to travel only one way and often do not have a handle. Plug valves fall into the stop valve category.

Other stop valve types include gate valves and ball valves. Though similar to plug valves, the shape of the parts and how they work to stop the flow of liquid typically determines the specific group they belong to. Regardless of group, stop valves typically control liquid through the use of a handle.

Operation of a plug valve is simple, making it a common valve choice. The user twists the handle and the ports are moved away from the opening in the pipe. In certain valves, a full turn is not required. Quarter-turn valves, for example, only require the user to make a short, quarter turn to stop the flow of liquid. Often, plug valves can lessen the flow without turning off completely if the user turns the valve half-closed but leaves it open wide enough for some liquid to make it through the ports.

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27 Oct

How Does a Water Check Valve Work?

  how-does-a-water-check-valve-work

    Check Valves

  • Check valves are devices that are installed in pipelines in order to stop the backflow of material. In many cases, the material flowing through the pipe is water, and the check valve keeps the water from flowing backwards in the pipe. They do not require any outside activation, but are rather designed with mechanisms that block the water from reversing direction at a certain point.

     Uses

  • Water check valves are used in several different devices, and they are advantageous for several reasons. For example, they stop flooding or overflowing in sump pumps and water heaters. They protect equipment in control valves, strainers and flowmeters. They also save power, because the backwards-flowing water would use up electricity even when the device was off.

     Types

  • There are several types of check valves that are installed in water-using devices, but they are all based on the same underlying principle. A ball check valve consists of a ball held in place by a spring. When the water flows forward, the spring contracts and the ball is pushed away from the opening of the valve. Therefore, the water can flow through the valve. When the water stops flowing, the spring pushes the ball back into the opening in the valve and stops the water from flowing backwards.Swing valves work in a similar way. Instead of a ball, swing valves contain a small door on hinges. When the water flows by the door, the door swings back on its hinges and allows the water through. When the water stops flowing, the door slams shut and stops any backflow from forming.Similarly, a split-disk check valve contains a metal plate that folds in half as the water flows past it. When the water stops flowing, the plate springs open and blocks the entrance of the valve.

 

 

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